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School’s Out, And For Many Students, So Is Lunch

0w2a0733_custom-fe40f2e9d51849ff787d78eb4b900e875dcc05b5-s800-c85Where does your lunch come from?

Avery Lill published an article, “School’s Out, And For Many Students, So Is Lunch” earlier this month, raising the question of what happens to the 30.3 million children nationwide who receive free or reduced-price lunches at their public schools during the summer (1).

According to the Alamance County Community Assessment, more than 57 children qualify for the National School Lunch program that provides free and reduced lunch in schools to children in low-income families (2).

Alamance-Burlington Public School System has ten schools which are eligible under the Healthy HungerFree Kids Act to provide free breakfast and lunch to all students because greater than 50% of their students are identified as needy (2). Of SNAP, WIC, and Free School Meal, 75% of recipients are at or below 200% of the poverty line in Alamance County (2).

“Summer break for many students is a time to kick back, play outside, and hang out with friends. For a significant portion of public school students in the United States, however, the end of school also brings a familiar question—what’s for lunch?

During the school year, about 30.3 million children receive free or reduced-price lunches at their public schools. But in the summer, only 2.6 million of those students receive a free or reduced lunch. That’s fewer than 10 percent” (1).

Sources
1) Lill, A. (2016, July 7). School’s Out, And For Many Students, So Is Lunch. NPR. Retrieved July 28, 2016, from http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2016/07/07/484217278/schools-out-and-for-many-students-so-is-lunch

2) Cone Health- Alamance Regional, United Way of Alamance County, Alamance County Health Department, Healthy Alamance, & Impact Alamance. (2015). 2015 Alamance County Community Assessment.  Retrieved July 28, 2016, from http://www.alamancecommunityassessment.com/